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A Perfectly Tuned Evening Every Time...
Opened in 2008, The Dirty Dog is one of the premiere destinations in the United States for world class Jazz and cuisine. It combines the charm of an English-style pub with intimacy and meticulous attention to detail and hospitality.
THE DIRTY DOG JAZZ CAFE BLOG
The Dirty Dog brings together the musicians and guests in a way that creates a lasting impression and desire to come back.
September 25, 2018

 

On September 20 there was a groundbreaking event in our town.

 

 

Gretchen Valade has a habit of breaking new ground. Last week she took this task literally.

 

 

Gretchen took part in a ceremonial groundbreaking for Wayne State’s  Gateway Performance Complex, which will include the Gretchen Valade Jazz Center.

The new complex will include:

 

  • Three new theaters including: the Gretchen Valade Jazz Center, a proscenium and studio theatre
  • New educational production space for students to hone their skills in performance, design and management
  • A modern café where guests can mingle before performances, during intermissions and after events
  • A patron lounge that allows invited guests to relax and socialize before the show.

Chris Collins, who heads up Wayne State’s jazz program, has a lot to be happy about. The City of Detroit will have in the Valade Center a shiny new venue that will offer spaces for students and professional musicians to perform, rehearse, network and collaborate. Chris reminded us that this is not only the largest gift the WSU Music Department has ever received, it’s the “largest arts gift the university has ever received.”

 

Gretchen will also donate $1 million for the Gretchen Valade Endowed Scholarship in Jazz Studies, to give scholarships to jazz studies students performing and working in the Valade Center.

 

Gretchen said, “My love of jazz music and of this great city have inspired and motivated me my entire life,” “I can’t imagine a more meaningful way to combine those passions than by supporting jazz education at Wayne State University.”

 

Chris Collins added that Gretchen is “something of an angel to jazz in Detroit” as she continues to support the music she loves not only financially, but also by bringing others together to further these initiatives.” “It’s not just financial — it’s her spirit, her vision, her love of artists,”

 

Gretchen once again has shown that she understands the importance of having venues available for our young artists as well as our established musicians.

 

 

 

GETTING THE KIDS READY TO PLAY THE VALADE CENTER

 

 

There is plenty of music all around us, but it is often in the background while our brain is focused on a task. Getting the time to get lost in some music just isn’t always available. Luckily in Detroit there are earnest efforts to bring our master artists into the community to share their gifts. Providing  an intimate experience with these teachers will assure that many young lives will be richer. I have seen the skill of our jazz educators with their young students and  I have witnessed these kids abandoning their cell phones after being introduced to something new.

This year I hope to spend time documenting the programs and the individuals whose lives will be enriched. I have always been impressed with the ability jazz musicians have to listen to the children. They seem to know how much that listening matters. Maybe it is that listening to others is the key to jazz.

 

 

  

 

KEEPING THE NEXT GENERATION AWARE OF ART, MUSIC AND ESPECIALLY OUR MOST FREEING FORM OF EXPRESSION: JAZZ

 

If you want to expand the audience of an art form, you need to get the next generation interested in it. This means that is important to let our kids discover the music themselves, or let them think they have. It is important to let their imagination take over, and to get them out to hear and see live music.

 

          

WHY ARE GRETCHEN AND OTHERS WORKING SO HARD TO MAKE JAZZ ACCESSIBLE TO OUR YOUTH?

 

Children learn to think on their feet which gives them confidence to take on complex tasks and problem solving. When children practice creating something collaboratively like jazz they get used to the idea that their actions affect other people. They learn that when they are not prepared or on-time, that other people suffer. Because mistakes are a regular part of the process of learning in the arts, children learn that it is important that when you make a mistake you take responsibility for it. They learn to acknowledge them, learn from them and move on.

 

They learn perseverance, focus, determination,  dedication and that learning can be fun.

 

 

 I got a glimpse of the joy that a great jazz program brings when I was asked to photograph the Jazz Band at Cass Technical High School last spring.

 

 

       

Keeping the joy and exhilaration in our hearts is a lifetime job, if we are lucky.

 

John Osler

 

COMING THIS WEEK TO THE DIRTY DOG JAZZ CAFÉ
This is a reminder that the Dirty Dog Jazz Café is a kid friendly place, meaning children of all ages stop by to escape and get lost in some music. Sitting in a comfortable chair and listening to jazz artists explore new places requires limited training.

September 26 – September 28

 

 

GERALD GIBBS

 

Gerald Gibbs loves what he does. He plays the Hammond B3 organ, and plays it, smiles and plays some more. Here is what James Carter said about Gerald:

 

“Gerard is basically a continuation of the organ tradition. Playing with him is like getting together with family. He is an individual that is always looking for new things in the music,” When Carter assembles an organ trio, Gerald is the organist he wants.

 

September 29

 

 

CONNIE HAN

 

Mack Avenue Records star, pianist Connie Han will appear in full force for one night at the Dirty Dog.

 

Try to catch a live performance of one of jazz’s hottest new stars.

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September 24, 2018

connieHan 1

 

 

This 22 year-old Los Angeles based pianist brings her unique brand of Jazz into the Neo-Noir scene on her debut album Crime Zone, coming out on Detroit’s own Mack Avenue Records, Oct. 12th.

 

 

 

 

ConnieHanCrimeZone

 

 

She grew up in a musical family environment with both parents being professional classical musicians who encouraged her to start piano lessons at age five.  She was 14 when she became interested in Jazz while at the Los Angeles County High School for the Arts where she connected with drummer Bill Wysaske who not only became her mentor but was also her producer on “Crime Zone”.

 

 

This multi-talented composer-pianist is comfortable playing standard acoustic piano as well as the electric Fender Rhodes which is inspired by legendary pianists, such as Herbie Hancock and Chick Corea from the fusion era of the 1960s and 1970s.

 

 

The new album features Han playing a mix of her own compositions and various choice covers. You’ll be able to witness a new pianist whose part of a group of new generation artists making their mark on the world Jazz scene.

 

 

It’s always exciting to discover new and fresh Jazz talent and you’ll have your chance to do so on Saturday, September 29 when Ms. Han brings her music the the Dirty Dog.

 

She’ll be giving us an advanced taste of the music on her new album roughly two weeks before it’s official release date.  Han is a next generation pianist who draws on many styles and time periods. Her music is both cutting edge and modern as well as Classic and traditional.

 

 

For one night only,  Connie Han, will be making a special appearance at The Dirty Dog on Saturday, September 29th in support of her upcoming, new release, Crime Zone, coming out on Mack Avenue Records, Oct. 12th.

 

 

Ms. Han will be performing two sets at 6pm and 7:30pm on. For more information call the Dirty Dog Jazz Café at 313-882-5299 or go to DirtyDogJazz.com

 

 

Detroit Public Radio mainstay, Judy Adams, is a pianist, composer and musicologist who hosts a Jazz and contemporary music show on CJAM 99.1FM and guest hosts on WRCJ 90.9FM.

 

 

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September 20, 2018

 

Detroit Album Profile:  Scott Gwinnell Jazz Orchestra / Mulgrew-ology / Detroit Music Factory

 

 

ScottGwennllMulgrewOlogy

 

 

Scott Gwinnell is a multi-talented Detroit based musician. Although he’s known as one of our town’s most talented pianists he’s also a composer, arranger, and educator who has been playing locally and internationally for more than 25 years.

 

 

He’s put all of these musical abilities to work on his new tribute album to the late Jazz piano icon, Mulgrew Miller. One of many new releases of Detroit Jazz artists on Detroit Music Factory records – part of the Mack Avenue records family.

 

 

Miller is considered one of the most dynamic pianists from the 1970’s until his passing in 2013. On the album, Gwinnell focuses on Miller’s extraordinary composing and arranging skills.

 

 

The album also features Mr.Gwinnell showing off his orchestral side as he has arranged all of the tracks on the new release for his own Jazz Orchestra. This star-studded ensemble features some of Detroit’s finest Jazz artists, such as James Hughes, Steve Wood, John Douglas, Anthony Stanco and others.

 

 

It’s obvious that Scott is well connected to Detroit Jazz scene. He’s very active in Detroit’s music community, which includes being Director of Vocal Jazz Education at the Music Hall Center for the Performing Arts, Ensemble Director at the MSU Community School- Detroit, and a Lecturer at Oakland University.

 

 

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Photo by John Osler

 

 

He studied with the late Detroit pianist, Bess Bonnier, early on and says his major influences include Duke Ellington, Wynton Kelly, Herbie Hancock, Keith Jarrett and McCoy Tyner.

 

 

Over the years, he has played with many acclaimed artists including Aretha Franklin, Roberta Flack, Dave Liebman, Marcus Belgrave, Steve Turre, and many others. He also has recorded four albums of his own.

 

 

He’s a very prolific composer, having written over 300 compositions, not only for piano but also symphony orchestra, and other ensemble configurations. In 2012, Gwinnell received two Detroit Music Awards for, “Best Jazz Composer”, and “Best Classical Composer.”

 

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He brings these talents together on the new album tribute to Mulgrew Miller featuring the Scott Gwinnell Jazz Orchestra. It’s “Mulgrew-ology”. Check it out.

 

 

 

 

 

Detroit Public Radio mainstay, Judy Adams, is a trained pianist, composer and musicologist who hosts a Jazz and contemporary music show on CJAM 99.1FM and guest hosts on WRCJ 90.9FM.

 

 

 

 

 

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September 19, 2018

 

Dave Bennett will be playing for four nights at the Dirty Dog Jazz Café this week.

 

 

For all four nights the place will be packed. it will be jammed with those who have an appreciation of jazz roots. They will be treated to being only feet away from musicians who share their love of jazz and will be playing it about as well as anybody could. They will unabashedly play music that makes one feel good to be alive.

 

Last week I shared an email that I received from a New York resident and Detroit jazz fan Yvonne Cummings that is worth repeating.

 

Good Day John:

 

This was the 4th year in a row that I have attended Detroit’s Jazz Festival.  It is by far the greatest festival I’ve ever attended.  What impresses me most is not only the cross section of music artists; both local and world renowned, especially Detroit’s own but the commitment of this festival to youth through providing high school and college students with an opportunity to present to a wider audience as will as giving them intimate exposure to the professionals, and where they can grow as musicians by participating in jam sessions.  As a native New Yorker I am jealous that we do not have anything as big, organized and cohesive as Detroit’s Jazz Festival. My other observation has to do with the wide spread support of jazz by local people; I haven’t witnessed such support in NYC at any venue whether free or for charge.  As an African-American I’ve been concerned that knowledge and legacy of  jazz may be lost to NYC youth. In NYC it is very rare to see more than a hand full of  younger African-Americans at jazz events; usually they feel like AARP gatherings.  It is wonderful to see kids in attendance, without their parents, at times with younger siblings in tow.  This festival gives me confidence in the future of jazz because of it’s commitment: to providing a venue for young musicians to improve, to support local artists and to expose everyone to the music.  Jazz is alive and well in Detroit.

 

Regards,

 

Yvonne Cummings

 

Yvonne’s comments refer to the Detroit Jazz Festival but could also be directed to anything that Gretchen Valade has touched. Yvonne would have remained put in the Big Apple, except for Gretchen’s love of jazz and her determination to see that everyone gets a chance to hear it. Without Gretchen we would only have politicians making speeches in Hart Plaza on Labor Day, and our local artists and soon to be artists would not have a chance to be honored and discovered.

 

WHAT GOES AROUND COMES AROUND

 

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Manhattan’s 52nd Street, 1948. Photo by WIlliam P. Gottlieb.

Gretchen Valade found herself in school in NYC, and was introduced to jazz. In the 1940’s, New York’s 52nd Street and Greenwich Village were littered with jazz clubs.

 

52nd Street was also called”The “Street”, The Street  of Dreams” or “Swing Street.”  After going from club to club  on 52nd Street, it was only a short cab ride down to Eddie Condon’s in Greenwich Village

 

These were musician friendly places where the artists could have their mail forwarded and were given a chance to be heard by the crowds stopping on their way to and from the theatre. Gretchen Valade discovered jazz at places like Eddie Condon’s.  On 52nd Sreet she may have seen Art Tatum play piano at the Famous Door, Coleman Hawkins at Kelly’s Stables and Willie “The Lion” Smith at the Hickory House. Bright lights might have drawn her to the 3 Deuces, the Onxy Club, 21 Club, Jimmy Ryan’s, Leon & Eddie’s.  Artie Shaw, Billie Holiday, Erroll Garner, Oscar Pettiford, Jack Teagarden, J.C Heard, and Count Basie all played “the Street.”

 

So many clubs all packed together created a strong sense of musical community. Artists could play a set at one club and walk to another to either listen to or sit in with another band. This created an exchange of ideas which pushed the music in new directions. Young musicians got to play with established masters. There existed a sense of solidarity and democracy that kept the music alive for three decades until the clubs gave way to new construction.

 

I had a chance to spend time on 52nd Street in the fifties and bought the mandatory two drinks at Eddie Condon’s. You never knew who would show up and sit in. Jack Teagarden might drop by with his trombone to play duets with “Wild” Bill Davidson.

 

Fortunately for Gretchen and me, we probably heard more jazz masters in one evening than most get to hear in a lifetime.

 

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Entrance to Condon’s on West Third, NYC, 1945. Photo courtesy Hank O’Neal

 

Without the existence of these clubs so many of jazz’s pioneers wouldn’t have had a place to pioneer, and Detroit wouldn’t have one the world’s greatest jazz promoters.

 

Dave Bennett and jazz musicians from around the world now have a showcase like Gretchen’s Dirty Dog Jazz Café. Our young musicians, as Yvonne Cummings noted, have a chance to be heard. Today Detroit continues to be a destination for jazz lovers.

 

 

 

We can be thankful that Gretchen needed to open a jazz club like Eddie Condon’s just down the street, create a record company and save our jazz festival. It was all because of what she learned while at school.

 

John Osler

 

DAVE BENNETT WILL BE AT THE DIRTY DOG JAZZ CAFÉ THIS WEEK

Sept 19 – Sept 22

 

Dave Bennett has promised us that he will bring some heat and smiles to those coming in hoping to find the same energy that Gretchen found on 52nd Street years ago.

 

 

_DSC6524_dsc6883dave-bennett 

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September 11, 2018

 

The 2018 Detroit Jazz Festival revealed again the resilience of our jazz music and showed us what it takes to keep the music alive and strong.

 

 

 

ADVERSITY AND DIVERSITY

 

Detroit was shining bright even when the sky was dark and threatening. The Detroit Jazz Festival always seems like it needs to be tested to see if it can still handle adversity. Again it proved that Detroit’s most joyous annual event can’t be put down by some dark clouds filled with lightning.

 

 

Detroit continues to show the power of our diverse community. It helps us through the adversity that we manage to face together. This year the weather caused delays and cancellations, and yet the crowd hung around and filled the venues once the all clear was given. Civility reigned and the musicians appreciated and responded to this town’s enthusiasm for jazz.

 

 

We have always known how important jazz is to Detroit and how fragile the health of jazz in Detroit can be. Without vigilant action this free wheeling form of music could easily be lost in the latest musical moment. Once a year we get proof that there are Detroiters who don’t want to see this happen, and there are many of us who benefit from all their work.

 

 

 

Many of those who show up at this purest of all jazz festivals come in from out of town. I was in the Mack Avenue Records talk tent where I had a chat with a visitor from New York City. Yvonne Cummings, like many who travel to the festival, makes a circle around the festival dates on her calendar. I asked her why she keeps making the effort to return to this jazz festival. What she said made me proud of our city. I asked her to stay in touch and  write to me her impressions of the festival.

 

Here is her reply.

 

Good Day John:

 

This was the 4th year in a row that I attended Detroit’s Jazz Festival.  It is by far the greatest festival I’ve ever attended.  What impresses me most is not only the cross section of music artists; both local and world renowned, especially Detroit’s own, but the commitment of this festival to youth through providing high school and college students with a opportunity to present to a wider audience as well as giving them intimate exposure to the professionals and where they can grow as musicians by participating in jam sessions.  As a native New Yorker I am jealous that we do not have anything as big, organized and cohesive as  Detroit’s Jazz Festival.  My other observation has to do with the wide spread support of jazz by local people; I haven’t witnessed such support in NYC at any venue whether free or for charge.  As an African-American I’ve been concerned that knowledge and legacy of  jazz may be lost to NYC youth.  In NYC it is very rare to see more than a hand full of  younger African-Americans at jazz events; usually they feel like AARP gatherings.  It is wonderful to see kids in attendance, without their parents, at times with younger siblings in tow.  This festival gives me confidence in the future of jazz because of it’s commitment: to providing a venue for young musicians to improve, to support local artists and to expose everyone to the music.  Jazz is alive and well in Detroit.

 

Regards,

 

Yvonne Cummings

 

 

There is a lot to think about and to be thankful for in what Yvonne has told us. She has seen the results of having music and the arts in our schools. In the past we have had excellent teachers in neighborhood classrooms who have sent well equipped students into advanced music programs with the skills and passion necessary to succeed.

 

Yvonne’s image of our musical vitality is reassuring but is in danger of fading away.  Funding for the arts is drying up and fewer and fewer young students are familiar with America’s gift to the world, jazz.

 

 

 

Wednesday afternoon I received Yvonne’s email and that very night her thoughts were brought to life by an event that I caught at the Dirty Dog. Sean Dobbins Sextet was scheduled to come on stage. But for the first half hour we had an unannounced treat as a quartet of young jazz artists started the evening. They showed us that the music is still being passed from one generation to the next. This was done at one of the premier jazz clubs. It is however a Detroit jazz club and proves Yvonne’s point. We care about our youth.

 

 

Following an excellent set we heard appreciation showered on the club for the opportunity given to these young players. The quality of the music showed the presence of some good mentoring. All six of Sean’s band turned out to be teachers and professors.

 

 

  

 

Thank you Yvonne for reminding us that we are pretty lucky to have those who continue to support jazz in our community. Thanks to all who keep the music alive.

 

John Osler

 

THIS WEEK AT THE DIRTY DOG

 

September 12 – September 15

 

 

KIMMIE HORNE

 

It is recommended that you make your reservations as soon as possible. Kimmie Horne is fast becoming a Detroit legend.  Other singers are starting to try to sing like Kimmie Horne

 

 

 6

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September 7, 2018

 

JazzCollage

 

 

We have covered many of these aspects in previous Jazz Notes blogs. However, we are gaining new readers all the time as Jazz itself is attracting new fans every day as increasingly more people are seeking out music with substance and depth. This is why it’s helpful for us to revisit a discussion on what sets Jazz apart from other styles. It’s definitely in a world all its own.

 

 

New Jazz fans soon discover that listening to jazz is quite different than other styles of music. There’s so much to listen for and, like other art forms, the more you understand its history, content and structure, the more you can appreciate. On the other hand, no one should feel intimidated by Jazz or any kind of music. All that really matters is if you like or not – if it “inspires” you in some way or you feel emotionally moved by it.

 

 

As we listen to Jazz we can focus on its complex harmonies, intricate rhythms, creative arrangements and other compositional elements. And, its spontaneous nature, and use of improvisation by skilled musicians, is why Jazz is so exciting, especially when performed live. Live Jazz upholds its tradition and encourages its audience to be attentive and concentrate on what they’re hearing to fully appreciate what’s going on in “real time”.

 

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Robert Glasper’s 2018 Release “R+R=Now”

 

 

Although Jazz can be very “free”, the music for the most part, is built upon the following basic structure. Most pieces start with an introduction, followed by the theme or “head”, then each musician will take turns with their solos, reinterpreting the melody, harmonies and rhythms of the theme.

 

 

Sometimes just the “melodic” instruments, such as the saxophone, trumpet, flute, etc. will solo, etc. Other times they’ll include the rhythm section, comprised of the piano/keyboards, bass and drums. After this developmental section of solos, the theme or “head” returns to close out the piece.

 

 

It is in the solos where we hear the most significant personal artistry in Jazz –  and that is the use of improvisation. No two solos are identical because the musicians are composing on the spot, usually playing off of the basic melodic, harmonic and rhythmic structure of the piece.

 

 

This is why it’s so important to be an attentive listener. If not, you miss the true essence of the music.

 

 

This is also why there is a certain code of listening behavior with live Jazz. Listeners are encouraged to show appreciation and applaud after each solo and sometimes within the piece itself.

 

 

Seasoned Jazz fans keep their conversations to a minimum out of respect for other audience members and for the musicians themselves who are spontaneously playing, composing and communicating with each other – in the moment.

 

 

In future blogs we will explore how Jazz has preserved the live listening experience.

 

 

 

Detroit Public Radio mainstay, Judy Adams, is a pianist, composer and musicologist who hosts a Jazz and contemporary music show on CJAM 99.1FM and guest hosts on WRCJ 90.9FM. She made her mark at WDET 101.9FM where she was program director and daily on-air music host for more than 30 years.

 

 

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September 4, 2018

 

EXPOSING A CITY’S SOUL & SPIRIT

 

Every year I think that the new jazz year starts with the Tuesday following Labor Day. The previous jazz year wraps up as I walk out of Hart Plaza, turn around and regretfully say goodbye to the Detroit Jazz Festival. This year the threats of a serious thunder storm interrupted the festival on several occasions. This year’s festival will still be considered one of the most successful according to the unofficial international smile meter. It was a remarkable display of resilience as the crowds took cover and reappeared when the weather cleared. The Detroit Jazz Festival is special because those who show up know jazz and accept the stuff that comes with it.

 

 

DETROIT JAZZ FESTIVAL

 

The festival is appropriately held on Labor Day weekend. However, metropolitan Detroit doesn’t take that weekend off. Everyone has a venue to go to and they are all  terrific. There is little reason to go out of town, with the absolute jewel being the Detroit Jazz Festival, where our community puts its soul on display. Every year we show off what we do best, exposing the roots of our music, pain, shame, joy, resilience, cleverness and a lot of kindness. The 2018 festival added some extra zest to its jazz. It seems as though we always get more than the planners planned . There was again something in the air that was inspiring the jazz artists. The crowd got it and showed their appreciation. Then musicians caught the fans’ vibes and used them. Everyone knew that something beautiful was going on.

 

 

This mutual respect is what  makes this festival unique. The crowd sitting on hard concrete seats become one with musicians sitting in their more comfortable chairs. They start to move together, everyone swaying, clapping with subtle foot taps, all of this movement synced to the music. I am often aware of the powerful connection between the artists and a Detroit audience.

 

Hopefully some city planners might have wandered in amidst this four day event held right in the middle of downtown. This is an event which takes the assets that exist in the city and shares these assets among a diverse and deserving following. Downtown Detroit glows with all the mutual respect. The planners will see examples of renewal happening  stage after stage and bands taking a solid foundation and building on it. It’s a pretty good model for our future growth.

 

 

EFFORT

 

The festival doesn’t happen without serious people planning and industrious people making it happen.

 

 

Detroit Jazz Festival Director Chris Collins

 

Thanks to all the great musicians for coming back and reminding us why you do come back. Thanks to all the staff and the volunteers who are often too busy to enjoy their own efforts.

 

          

 

AND THANKS TO ALL THE REGULARS

 

 

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For 39 years I have seldom missed a Detroit Jazz Festival. I am a proud REGULAR. I have many reasons to not want to miss this unique Detroit event. One reason is that it is free. It is also close by. Then there is the music and food, which are terrific. But it is the chance to be around the many others like myself who tend to be proud of their town that brings me back time after time. These are the regulars. They can be counted on to know the music and a lot of the musicians. They know why they are there. These are the the familiar faces  I want to walk up to and say hi. I don’t know their names, but that doesn’t matter. They are friends.

 

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This magical Detroit Festival is a magnet for so many pure jazz fans from Detroit and in growing numbers folks from other places. The world’s largest free jazz festival through the years has attracted many guests to the city who regularly plan their end of summer weekend to be part of our festival. Their presence is a big salute to those who work so hard to keep the festival at such a high level.

 

SUPER REGULARS

 

Tom and Gretchen   

 

 

Two of the regulars are Detroit’s grand champion, Gretchen Valade and Tom Robinson.

 

Her touch is seen in all those things that work so well at the Detroit Jazz Festival. Her vision will always be on display during the four festive days. Every note will reflect her passion, integrity  and vitality.

 

Tom quietly has done all the things that have been  necessary to keep the  Festival on an even keel. Both are essential regulars.

 

NOW WHAT?

 

 

  

 

WELCOME BACK TO THE DIRTY DOG JAZZ CAFE´

 

The crew from the Dirty Dog will wrap up their stuff from the Dirty Dog tent Labor day evening and begin getting everything ready at the Dirty Dog. They will be ready to keep the music going and welcome everyone back.

 

               

 

TAD WEED 1957 – 2018

 

” Pianist Tad Weed displays a very rare ability to cross over from dashing bop lines to rich impressions, he has the bases covered, from funky blues to the border of the avant-garde.”  -Leonard Feather

 

 

  

 

Last week we lost a friend and one of the Dirty Dog Jazz Café go-to musicians, pianist Tad Weed. Tad’s trio graced the the club many times. Tad was a deeply knowledgable musician and a skilled pianist. Tad was sought after to be a bandmate and loved as a person. Tad will be missed.

 

 

John Osler

 

 

  

 

 

COMING THIS WEEK TO THE DIRTY DOG JAZZ CAFE´ SEPT 5 – SEPT 8

 

 

SEAN DOBBINS

 

Drummer Sean Dobbins will continue the high level of excitement from this year’s Detroit Jazz Festival.

 

 

 

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August 29, 2018

DetroitJazzFest

 

Photo: DetroitEmuPipeline.com

 

 

The 39th annual Detroit Jazz Festival takes place this Labor Day weekend at various stages in downtown Detroit. Performances are scheduled from Friday, 8/31/18 thru Monday 9/3/18 and the line-up of artists is spectacular. To find out more about who’s playing and where, go to DetroitJazzFest.org.

 

 

I’ve heard from so many Jazz fans who want to know who to see since the festival is so massive.
I decided to make a list of some of my top picks just to give folks some direction.

 

 

First of all, ALL of the music is great so you can’t go wrong, but if you are looking for some suggestions, check out my list below: “Jazz Notes” Best of the Fest for 2018!

 

 

JPMorgan Chase Main Stage (Campus Martius)

 

FRIDAY, AUG. 31

 

6:30 p.m. Dr. Valade’s Brass Band led by New Orleans legend, Shannon Powell 7:00

 

Resident Ensemble: Terri Lyne Carrington and Esperanza Spalding – Tribute to Geri Allen “Open On All Sides”

 

 

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Esperanza Spalding

 

 

8:20–8:40 p.m. Monsieur Periné 9:00–10:15 p.m. 2018 Artist-in-Residence: Chick Corea Akoustic Band

 

 

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Pianist/Composer Chick Corea performs all four days of the Festival as its “Artist-In-Residence”. Photo by ChickCorea-First-Works.org

 

 

SATURDAY, SEPT. 1

 

Chase Main Stage

8:00–9:15 p.m. Nicholas Payton – Afro-Caribbean Mixtape Project

 

Carhartt Amphitheater Stage

1:15–2:20 p.m. Wayne State University Lab Band I with Omar Sosa

3:15–4:30 p.m. Julian Lage Trio

5:15–6:30 p.m. Straight Ahead 25th Anniversary Reunion featuring: Regina Carter, Marion Hayden, Gayelynn McKinney and Alina Morr

 

7:15–8:30 p.m. Dr. Lonnie Smith Organ Trio

 

9:15–10:30 p.m. 2018 Artist-in-Residence: Chick Corea Elektric Band

 

Wayne State Pyramid Stage

 

5:30–6:45 p.m. Emmet Cohen Trio

 

SUNDAY, SEPT 2

 

Chase Main Stage

 

NOON–1:15 p.m. Michigan State University Jazz Orchestra I

 

2:00–3:15 p.m.

 

Karriem Riggins with the Detroit Jazz Fest Alumni Band and guests

 

4:00–5:15 p.m.

 

Hubtones: Freddie Hubbard 80th Birthday Celebration – Featuring: Nicholas Payton, Randy Brecker, David Weiss, and Dwight Adams 6:00–7:15 p.m. Chris Dave and the Drumhedz

 

 

8:00–9:15 p.m. Resident Ensemble: Terri Lyne Carrington and Esperanza Spalding – Tribute to Geri Allen with Detroit Jazz Festival Orchestra and conductor Edmar Colón Giebolini “Dream Time”

 

 

OmarSosaAllAboutJazzCom

 

Cuban pianist Omar Sosa / Photo by All About Jazz.com

 

 

Carhartt Amphitheater Stage

 

3:15–4:30 p.m. Harold López-Nussa Trio with Grégoire Maret and Pedrito Martinez

 

7:15–8:30 p.m. Omar Sosa Quarteto AfroCubano

 

9:15–10:30 p.m. Marcus Miller

 

Wayne State Pyramid Stage

 

5:30–6:45 p.m. Ralphe Armstrong Fusion Reunion

 

7:30–8:45 p.m. Pat Martino Quintet

 

 

MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 3

 

Chase Main Stage

 

12:45–2:00 p.m. University of Michigan Jazz Ensemble: A Tribute to Geri Allen with special guest Regina Carter

 

3:00–4:15 p.m. The Brecker Brothers Band Reunion

 

5:00–6:15 p.m. Resident Ensemble: Terri Lyne Carrington and Esperanza Spalding – Tribute to Geri Allen “Flying Toward the Sound”

 

 

Carhartt Amphitheater Stage

 

4:30–5:30 p.m. Cécile McLorin Salvant

 

7:00–8:15 p.m. 2018 Artist-in-Residence: Chick Corea with the Detroit Jazz Festival Symphony Orchestra and conductor, Steven Mercurio

 

 

HAPPY LISTENING!

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August 27, 2018

THIS WEEK THE DIRTY DOG JAZZ CAFÉ IS CLOSED AND MOVING TO BE PART OF DETROIT’S GREAT JAZZ FESTIVAL

 

Why would the smart gang at the Dirty Dog think of moving the operation? The answer is: they are going to take the operation to  where the best jazz in town will be playing. The Dog is setting up its operation in downtown Detroit right in the middle of the Detroit Jazz Festival. Maybe, they are just pretty smart.

 

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THE GOOD NEWS IS THE DOG IS ONLY CLOSED FOR ONE WEEK, AUGUST 28 – SEPT 1

 

  

 

THE BEST OF TWO WORLDS

 

 

Gretchen Valade is Detroit jazz’s guardian angel. She is also someone who defends her right to do things well. Her love of music and food meant that it will be possible to enjoy the Dirty Dog fare while listening and watching great acts at the jazz fest.

 

 

THE 39 th  DETROIT JAZZ FESTIVAL

AUGUST31  – SEPTEMBER 3, 2018

 

Now in its 39th year, the festival will take place from Hart Plaza to Campus Martius . The festival offers educational activities for adults and children, fireworks, late-night jam sessions, rare opportunities to meet the artists and much more. And it’s all FREE.

 

People know that Detroit’s festival is special. From all over the world jazz lovers circle the date of the Detroit Jazz Festival. Those who come find jazz of great intelligence, energy and purity. There is little hype and  a lot of music. Visitors learn that Detroit can throw a festival, and we will again  get the credit for doing something right. This year’s festival will  attract upwards of 750,000 people who will spread the good word about Detroit.

 

How lucky for us that it was someone of Gretchen’s integrity who took charge.  She was determined to keep the event Detroit’s event. Today it remains free for all to enjoy and reflects the best side of Detroit’s character.

 

Gretchen has made me aware that the festival doesn’t just happen. It takes planning, hard work, attention to details and oversight.  It’s not just casual oversight. but oversight that comes with purpose and a respect for the music and the people of Detroit.  Good fortune is with us as it is Gretchen on the watch.

 

She gets things done with grace and authority.  The festival is the result of the right people doing their best to provide Detroit music lovers the best free Jazz festival in the world.  Gretchen continues to think ahead of many of us and doesn’t skip out on the job.

 

For four days at the end of summer the best of Detroit can be experienced in our downtown.  The most knowledgeable group of Jazz fans will be  treated to great Jazz.  Nothing is done all year that doesn’t have these fans in mind.  Crowds will drift from venue to venue while behind the public view crews will be taking care of all the details that that will make the 2016 Detroit Jazz Festival a glorious success.  All the hard work and planning will pay off. Meanwhile Chef Andre Nemanis  and the Dirty Dog staff will be serving  some sumptuous savory barbecue to some lucky jazz fans. All thanks to  the planner in chief.

 

 

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A community of like spirits will gather to celebrate the music and good fellowship.

 

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while the scent of Dirty Dog barbecue wafts its way up Woodward Avenue drawing us in for some chow and a beverage.

 

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This could turn out to be a good move. Enjoy!

 

John Osler

COMING TO THE DIRTY DOG JAZZ CAFE´

 

September 5 – September 8

 

 

SEAN DOBBINS

 

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August 21, 2018

AUGUST

 

We just returned from vacation. We drove through lush deep summer Michigan landscapes and eventually landed back home in Detroit. We passed by a lot of green forest and yet to be harvested corn and other crops. Michigan has a dense beauty that is reassuring and seemingly unchanged through all the  years that we have been doing this trip. Detroit is changing, and as we approaching Ann Arbor and then Detroit we were reintroduced to competitive traffic and purposeful activity.

 

We returned to television, phones and the news that Aretha Franklin had died.

 

        

 

 

I also returned to the Dirty dog Jazz Café where I listened to Rayse Biggs, Buddy Budson, Dave McMurray, Sean Dobbins and Ibrahim Jones remind me that all the good stuff is still around and still comes out in the music.

 

 

 

AUGUST IN MICHIGAN

 

August brings us plenty to celebrate in Michigan . Crops that were planted this spring are ripe and ready to eat. We will be able to eat breakfast on the porch and dinner outdoors on pleasantly warm summer evenings, Music concerts and festivals abound.

 

 

August in Michigan requires restraint when entering the grocery store and special caution when you come upon a fresh fruit stand. This is loose clothes season in Michigan. Our great local produce starts showing up, and it all goes well at a picnic. At the Dirty Dog Chef Andre and his crew will use Michigan’s rich fresh bounty that is  available only at this time of year. Standing and clapping will help balance out the mouth watering fare at the Dirty Dog.

 

PURE MICHIGAN

 

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We returned at the end  of our local blueberry season. The slogan Pure Michigan  is pasted on most cartons of these succulent berries. The State of Michigan has for a long time run commercials  that highlight the natural beauty of Michigan.  This glorious state has inspired an appropriate ad theme. I believe that Detroit should think of incorporating one of its greatest assets, the rich music scene, into all of their promotions. We draw millions of visitors to our music festivals because the world wants to know what authentic new music Detroit has come up with.  Detroit shows off its musical riches  with free outdoor music concerts downtown almost every weekend. Labor Day will bring to downtown Detroit  one of the world’s finest music festivals, the Detroit Jazz Festival. We need to think about promoting our city with a product that already exists – our music.

 

 

“PURE DETROIT”

 

Last week we lost Aretha Franklin. Aretha Franklin was pure Detroit. Every time I heard Aretha I wondered why she took so much risk. There was always a feeling I had that maybe she was reaching too high. She took us with her out onto  musical limbs, then she would leap up to higher scarier  limbs and then she would soar into new previously unknown places.  When she took us on her journeys, I found great relief and joy when she landed. She was remarkable. Luckily she shared her gifts with the world.

 

Here are some things the world said.

 

They talked about her roots being in gospel and in Detroit, about how she also drew on jazz, the blues, rock and, later, opera, about how her unique and majestic swoops and squeals combined the improvisation of jazz, the hurt of the blues and the force of rock.

 

Amanda Petrusich, a staff writer atThe New Yorker wrote.

When Aretha sings “Amazing Grace” in a church, it’s suddenly not a song anymore, or not really—the melody, the lyrics, they’re rendered mostly meaningless. A few bits of organ, some piano. Who cares? Congregants yelling “Sing it!” None of it matters. I’m not being melodramatic—we are listening to the wildest embodiment of a divine signal. She receives it and she broadcasts it. “Singing” can’t possibly be the right word for this sort of channelling.

 

To listen to Aretha Franklin now is to hear everything—everything that came before her, each strain of American blues and jazz and gospel and soul, all the musical traditions people leaned on to stay alive, and everything that exists now, all the singers she gave license to, everyone she taught. Her death is in all of us, as her songs are in all of us. She is as immortal as can be.”

 

Mary J. Blige

“Aretha is a gift from God. When it comes to expressing yourself through song, there is no one who can touch her. She is the reason why women want to sing.”

Barack Obama added,

“Aretha helped define the American experience. In her voice, we could feel our history, all of it and in every shade—our power and our pain, our darkness and our light, our quest for redemption and our hard-won respect. May the Queen of Soul rest in eternal peace.”

 

 

The Queen is gone. Long live the Queen!

 

The world praised Aretha, acknowledged her faults and eccentricities and in their praise there was a little envy. Not everybody can have the skill, surety of self and the courage to talk about their pain and joy, Not everybody can be from Detroit.

“Looking out on the morning rain
I used to feel so uninspired
And when I knew
I had to face another day
Lord, it made me feel so tired
Before the day I met you
Life was so unkind
But you’re the key to
My peace of mind.”

It’s good to be back home.

John Osler

 

AUGUST 22 – AUGUST 23

 

 

NICOLE NEW

Detroit keeps on giving. New talent (no pun intended) keeps coming forward. Renewal continues to keep Detroit at the forefront of jazz. This will be jazz singer Nicole New’s first night at the Dirty Dog.

 

AUGUST 24 – AUGUST 25

 

   

 

FREDDY COLE

 

Freddy Cole is not new to the Dirty Dog Jazz Café. Freddy reminds us that it is OK to smile with pleasure at a jazz club. His minimalist piano and clear warm vocals are a perfect fit

 

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Each week the Dirty Dog Jazz Cafe hosts live performances from the greatest jazz musicians across the country.
Gerard Gibbs
STARTS: Wed, September 26 2018
ENDS: Fri, September 28 2018
Connie Han
STARTS: Sat, September 29 2018
ENDS: Sat, September 29 2018
Ron English
STARTS: Wed, October 03 2018
ENDS: Sat, October 06 2018
Ralphe Armstrong
STARTS: Wed, October 10 2018
ENDS: Thu, October 11 2018
Freda Payne
STARTS: Fri, October 12 2018
ENDS: Sat, October 13 2018
Scott Gwinell
STARTS: Wed, October 17 2018
ENDS: Sat, October 20 2018