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A Perfectly Tuned Evening Every Time...
Opened in 2008, The Dirty Dog is one of the premiere destinations in the United States for world class Jazz and cuisine. It combines the charm of an English-style pub with intimacy and meticulous attention to detail and hospitality.
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The Dirty Dog brings together the musicians and guests in a way that creates a lasting impression and desire to come back.
Archive for
Jazz Notes With Judy Adams
August 9, 2018

 

rayseRalphArmstrong

 

Trumeter Rayse Biggs and bassist Ralph Armstrong at the Dirty Dog Jazz Cafe

 

Photo: JazzInOurTime.com

 

 

Trumpeter Rayse Biggs has been a longstanding favorite with local Detroit and international audiences for many years. He returns to the Dirty Dog stage Wednesday, August 15 through Saturday, August 18 with an all-star band consisting of pianist Buddy Budson, bassist Ibrahim Jones, and drummer Patrick Doran.

 

Rayse has been involved in music for most of his life. He came from a musical family where just about everyone played an instrument.  He says he’s never had stage fright because he was always playing for “family” early on.

 

 

Although the piano was his first instrument, Rayse was always intrigued by the trumpet.  He said his fate was sealed when trumpeter Marcus Belgrave came and played at his Junior High in 1969 and later became his mentor.

 

 

Now, Rayse is a mentor himself as he spends time educating new and emerging students of Jazz. He has shared his youth music programs with the Detroit Symphony, Plymouth Education Center and throughout metro-Detroit.​

 

 

Rayse is known for being an entertaining performer and is quite the showman who infuses a lot of humor and personality into his sets. He’ll also do interesting things with the music itself such as scat, mumble (a vocal technique he learned from the great Jazz trumpeter, Clark Terry), and play trumpet and flugelhorn at the same time.

 

 

rayse2horns

 

Rayse Biggs playing trumpet and flugelhorn at the same time.

Photo: JazzInOurTime.com

 

 

Although he started on piano, Mr. Biggs had always been intrigued by the trumpet. His musical fate was sealed after trumpeter Marcus Belgrade came to his junior high school in 1969 and later became a mentor to Mr. Biggs. Soon after he went on tour with a number of Motown groups such as Smokey Robinson, the Marvelettes and the Temptations.

 

 

Later, his brother Travis, a violinist, took him to the Metropolitan Arts Complex, where a young Rayse would meet Donald Byrd, Herbie Hancock and Freddie Hubbard, the of whom would “play licks on the phone for me,” Mr. Biggs says. “It was just a blessing” to have that contact.

 

 

After graduating from Detroit’s Chadsey High School in 1972, Mr. Biggs went on the road with a number of Motown acts — Smokey Robinson, the Marvelettes and the Temptations, to his recollection. The next year he entered Oakland University.

 

 

​Since then his talents and musical travels have taken him far and wide to such distant places as Senegal and elsewhere around the globe, performing with the likes of Kem, Was Not Was, The Dramatics, Kidd Rock, Bob Dylan, Matthew Chicoine and Recloose and many others.

 

 

 

 

 

Detroit Public Radio mainstay, Judy Adams, is a pianist, composer and musicologist who hosts a Jazz and contemporary music show on CJAM 99.1FM and guest hosts on WRCJ 90.9FM. She made her mark at WDET 101.9FM (NPR), where she was Director of Programming and daily on-air music host for more than 30 years.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Trumpeter Rayse Biggs has been a longstanding favorite with local Detroit and international audiences for many years. He returns to the Dirty Dog stage Wednesday, August 15 through Saturday, August 18 with an all-star band consisting of pianist Buddy Budson, bassist Ibrahim Jones, and drummer Patrick Doran.

 

 

Rayse has been involved in music for most of his life. He came from a musical family where just about everyone played an instrument. He says he’s never had stage fright because he was always playing for “family” early on.

 

 

Although the piano was his first instrument, Rayse was always intrigued by the trumpet. He said his fate was sealed when trumpeter Marcus Belgrave came and played at his Junior High in 1969 and later became his mentor.

 

 

Now, Rayse is a mentor himself as he spends time educating new and emerging students of Jazz. He has shared his youth music programs with the Detroit Symphony, Plymouth Education Center and throughout metro-Detroit.

 

 

Rayse is known for being an entertaining performer and is quite the showman who infuses a lot of humor and personality into his sets. He’ll also do interesting things with the music itself such as scat, mumble (a vocal technique he learned from the great Jazz trumpeter, Clark Terry), and play trumpet and flugelhorn at the same time.

 

 

Although he started on piano, Mr. Biggs had always been intrigued by the trumpet. His musical fate was sealed after trumpeter Marcus Belgrade came to his junior high school in 1969 and later became a mentor to Mr. Biggs. Soon after he went on tour with a number of Motown groups such as Smokey Robinson, the Marvelettes and the Temptations.
Later, his brother Travis, a violinist, took him to the Metropolitan Arts Complex, where a young Rayse would meet Donald Byrd, Herbie Hancock and Freddie Hubbard, the of whom would “play licks on the phone for me,” Mr. Biggs says. “It was just a blessing” to have that contact.
After graduating from Detroit’s Chadsey High School in 1972, Mr. Biggs went on the road with a number of Motown acts — Smokey Robinson, the Marvelettes and the Temptations, to his recollection. The next year he entered Oakland University.

 

 

Since then his talents and musical travels have taken him far and wide to such distant places as Senegal and elsewhere around the globe, performing with the likes of Kem, Was Not Was, The Dramatics, Kidd Rock, Bob Dylan, Matthew Chicoine and Recloose and many others.

 

 

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July 31, 2018

BirdMiles1945YouTubeCom

 

Charlie Parker and Miles Davis at the Three Deuces in New York, circa 1945. Both artists were not only the key architects of the highly improvisational Jazz form, BeBop, but also two of the top improvisers in the history of Jazz.  Photo: YouTube.com

 

 

Getting the most out of Jazz, involves listener participation, because the more we hear the more we can appreciate. This is also because Jazz is considered a “higher” musical art form, with its complex melodic, harmonic and rhythmic elements, and use of improvisation.

 

 

I like to think of it as “improve-isation”, where artists rework structural elements of a piece such as the melody, chord progressions, etc. The musicians create “on the spot”, in real time, making each performance a unique experience.

 

 

Most of the time there is a theme that one is improvising off of. This is usually the main melody which is what fuels most solos. It is a central idea or phrase that is often repeated throughout the piece. Some artists also improvise off of rhythmic patterns or other compositional elements as well. These are things to listen for initially. Concentrating on these themes is what guides the listener through the improvisation.

 

 

Although improvisation is spontaneous it still involves tools and special techniques musicians utilize to reconstruct the music. Sometimes the theme is played with different modes or scales. Some artists will alter the phrasing by keeping the general frame work the same but changing the beginning and ending of the phrase.

 

 

Jazz improvisational styles also vary from group to group and from musician to musician. Some artists leave elements of the theme intact, allowing it to shine through the improvisation, while others favor a more abstract, formless approach. Each type of Jazz also seems to favor a different approach to improvisation as well. Traditional Jazz favors a more conservative approach while contemporary Jazz  often encourages the musicians to be more adventurous and experimental.

 

 

The attentive listener will be able to hear the alterations in the thematic material enough to appreciate the musician’s individual interpretation of the music. Most of the “pop” music today doesn’t contain these compositional complexities. But it is this intellectual and artistic depth that attracts us to the Jazz experience in the first place. It’s also what gives Jazz its lasting appeal.

 

If you want to hear a great Jazz improviser, check out the music of Charlie Parker, known as one of the top improvisers in the history of Jazz.

 

 

charlieParker

 

Charlie Parker / Photo: The Daily Beast.com

 

Charlie Parker, (August 29, 1920 – March 12, 1955), also known as Yardbird and Bird, was an American Jazz saxophonist and compose, known as one of the most proficient improvisors of the idiom. He was a highly influential Jazz soloist and a leading figure in the development of Bebop, a form of Jazz characterized by and intense use of improvisation with fast tempos, virtuosic technique and advanced harmonies. Parker was a blazingly fast virtuoso, and he introduced revolutionary harmonic ideas including rapid passing chords, new variants of altered chords, and chord substitutions. Excerpted fromWikipedia.

 

 

 

 

Detroit Public Radio mainstay, Judy Adams, is a trained pianist, composer and musicologist who hosts a Jazz and contemporary music show on CJAM 99.1FM and guest hosts on WRCJ 90.9FM.

 

 

 

 

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July 23, 2018

My weekly blog, “Jazz Notes”, has been going strong now for four years! It was back in 2014 that the Dirty Dog Jazz Café approached fellow-blogger, John Osler, and I to write about Jazz for their website.

 

 

jazzCollage

 

 

Our local Jazz club in Grosse Pointe Farms, The Dirty Dog, just celebrated its tenth anniversary and has already achieved world-class status. Musicians who play there have spread the word on how dedicated the Dirty Dog is to presenting top Jazz artists, both local and international. They’re all about the music. The audience knows it and the musicians know it as well.

 

 

It’s such a thrill having the opportunity to write about Jazz each week – sharing my passion for the genre I’ve been studying and enjoying for most of my life. “Jazz Notes” aims to connect you to the style makers and leaders, both past and present, of Detroit’s, world renowned, ever fervent Jazz scene.

 

 

This is what has helped Detroit be known as one of the world’s great Jazz capitols, with musicians who have represented our city while taking the famous “Detroit Sound” on their musical travels and tours. These artists include such notables as brothers, Elvin Jones, Thad Jones and Hank Jones, Milt Jackson, Kenny Burrell, Donald Byrd, Kenny Garrett,  Aretha Franklin (who began her major recording career as a Jazz artist), Ralph Armstrong, James Carter, Alice Coltrane, Marcus Belgrave, Wendell Harrison and so many others. “Jazz Notes” puts us in touch with Detroit’s rich Jazz history on a regular basis.

 

 

wendellHarrison

 

Saxophonist and composer, Wendell Harrison

 

 

“Jazz Notes” tries to demystify the music and make it accessible to all who are drawn to it.
We write about its compositional styles and structure and about the musicians and what they bring to the stage with their individualistic creative improvisations and performance skills.

 

 

This past year has been so full of special moments, with “Jazz Notes” taking all of us deeper into the magic of Jazz by reflecting and sharing these special moments with you.

 

 

Some of these include “Jazz Notes” blog features on 2018 Detroit Jazz Festival Artist in Resident, Chick Corea, and his stunning performance at the Dirty Dog in April. Other blog highlights this year include album reviews of new releases from David McMurray, Gayelynn McKinney as well as Dirty Dog performances featuring the recent reunion of Straight Head and Esperanza Spalding with Terri Lyne Carrington, who are this year’s Resident Ensemble at the Detroit Jazz Festival. Their sets at the Dirty Dog also featured multi-talented pianist Ian Finkelstein.

 

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Detroit pianist, Ian Finkelstein / photo by John Osler

 

Follow Jazz Notes on Facebook or on the Dirty Dog Jazz Café website, DirtyDogJazz.com where our past blogs have been archived and available. Thanks again for your interest in the music.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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July 17, 2018

 

coltraneLostAlbum

John Coltrane, “Both Directions at Once, the Lost Album” / Impulse (2018)

 

 

 

 

A few weeks ago, Impulse records released a new album by the late John Coltrane entitled “Both Directions at Once – The Lost Album”. It was a lost studio album from 1963 featuring his classic quartet with McCoy Tyner, piano, Jimmy Garrison, bass, Elvin Jones drums and Coltrane on tenor and soprano saxophones.

 

 

History was in the making as the album put us in a time warp with one of the most important bands in Jazz during one of their most creative periods.

 

 

ColtraneNPRorg

 

John Coltrane’s classic quartet in the recording studio in 1963. Photo/ NPR.org

 

 

Iconic saxophonist Sonny Rollins said “this is like finding a new room in the great pyramid”. This new release is a true treasure for Jazz fans around the world.

 

 

The story from Impulse goes like this:

“The first week of March in 1964 was busy for John Coltrane. He was in the midst of a two-week run at Birdland and was gearing up to record the famed John Coltrane and Johnny Hartman album which he did on March 7. But there was a session the day before that was a stuff of legend, until now.

 

 

coltraneBillboardCom

 

John Coltrane, photo / Billboard.com

 

 

On March 6, Coltrane and the quartet went to the legendary Van Gelder studios and cut a complete album’s worth of material, including several original compositions that were never recorded elsewhere. They spent the day committing different versions of these pieces to tape, playing them different ways and in different configurations.

 

 

At the end of the day, Coltrane left the studios with a reference tape and brought it to the home in Queens he shared with his wife Naima. These tapes remained untouched for the next 54 years until Impulse approached the family, including his son, Ravi Coltrane, about finally releasing the last album. Mr. Coltrane now presides over important reissues of his parent’s recordings.

 

 

The musical implications, the original compositions, the arrangements, the band, the year it was recorded, all amount to a rediscovery and re-contextualization of one of the most important musicians of our time.

 

 

“Both Directions at Once” features original never-before-heard compositions along with alternative versions of Trane’s classics from this period such as “Impressions”, “Nature Boy”, “One Up, One Down” and more”.

 

 

And, as you may know, “Jazz Notes” loves finding a Detroit connection to our many Jazz stories and features we present each week. Our connection here is to inform you that world-class saxophonist in his own right, Ravi Coltrane, is one of the headliners at this year’s Detroit Jazz Festival, August 31-September 3 in downtown Detroit. He will be presenting “Ravi Coltrane’s Universal Consciousness: Melodic Meditations of Alice Coltrane”. Go to DetroitJazzFest.com for more information.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Detroit Public Radio mainstay, Judy Adams, is a pianist, composer and musicologist who hosts a Jazz and contemporary music show on CJAM 99.1FM and guest hosts on WRCJ 90.9FM. She made her mark at WDET 101.9FM (NPR), where she was Director of Programming and daily on-air music host for more than 30 years.

 

 

 

 

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July 9, 2018

 

DJF_BandBanner2_Update

 

Discovering New Jazz

 

After writing about new Jazz releases the past two weeks on our “JazzNotes” blog, it made me think about all of the musicians on the forefront who are keeping the idiom fresh with new sounds and ideas.

 

 

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Detroit Jazz Drummer Karriem Riggins will be at the 2008 Detroit Jazz Festival

 

As we’ve mentioned in previous blog articles, Jazz must stay current while preserving its heritage. By staying current, it ensures Jazz’s future by constantly infusing itself with the newest sounds being created by Jazz artists around the world. Since the beginning Jazz has been able to avoid becoming stagnant and has, instead, grown with the times by reflecting current culture.  This is primarily done by the younger up and coming new and emerging artists who are usually close to the newest sounds and popular trends.

 

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Another stellar Detroit drummer, band leader,  and composer, GayeLynn McKinney, will also be at this year’s Detroit Jazz Festival

 

 

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Cuban pianist, composer and bandleader, Omar Sosa, will be at the 2018 Detroit Jazz Festival

 

One of the best places to discover new sounds in Jazz is at well programmed Jazz festival such as the Detroit Jazz Festival which takes place Labor Day weekend on various stages in downtown Detroit. Festivals of this kind offer the full-spectrum of Jazz styles.

 

 

Our world-renowned festival has been around since 1980 and it continues to be a showcase for veteran players and classic stylists as well as new trends and fresh talent. If you want to discover new Jazz, this is the place. It takes place August 31-September 3 and t’s free so you’re able to take in as much music as you like. You can stroll from stage to stage and get a good taste from a variety of styles whether you’re a seasoned fan or new to the music.

 

 

For more information on our festival, including the performance schedule, go to detroitjazzfest.org

 

 

 

 

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June 29, 2018

 

 

R+R=NowCD

 

 

 

Artist/Group / Title / Label

 

 

R+R=Now / Collagically Speaking / Blue Note

 

R+R=NOW is a group of leading artists who continue to redefine the definition of modern Jazz for the 21st century. They include Robert Glasper, Terrace Martin, Christian Scott aTunde Adjuah, Derrick Hodge, Taylor McFerrin & Justin Tyson.

 

 

The “R+R” in the band’s name stands for Reflect+Respond, as their music, like the 1960’s, “reflects and responds” to the current political and cultural environment. With Collagically Speaking, the band presents a deep musical hybrid that they have been championing for a few years now. The title was inspired by Nina Simone who said an artist’s duty is to reflect the times.

 

 

As Glasper says, R+R=NOW tells “our story from our point of view… It’s a very honest, fluid sound that rings of hip-hop, EDM, jazz, at times – hell – reggae… a bunch of cats that respect each other so much that we always pass the ball.” The collective approach on the album features special guests such as Omari Hardwick, Terry Crews, Stalley, Amanda Seales, Amber Navran, Goapele, Jahi Sundance and Yasiin Bey.

 

 

The album is a “collage” flowing seamlessly from track to track. Put in the player and let it roll.

 

 

charlesLloydLuciindaCD

 

 

Charles Lloyd and the Marvels + Lucinda Williams / Vanished Gardens / Blue Note

 

Jazz meets rock and country and is held together by the blues.  This album is a provocative blend of the musical worlds of two very different artists who have a lot in common when it comes to their approach and attitude towards the music they create.

 

Renowned Jazz saxophonist, Charles Lloyd, creates warm and sculptured tones as he plays emotive lines that reflect his 80 years on the planet. This leads the way for the inclusion of the award-winning,  neo-country singer/song writer, Lucinda Williams, who also has a sound all her own. The “Jazz meets C&W” feel is reflected in the instrumentation and all-star band that includes Bill Frisell on guitar and Greg Leisz on pedal steel.

 

 

The album is produced by Don Was who had the vision of bringing these genres together which is a rare yet challenging blend made possible by these stellar artists.

 

 

Other new albums of note include:

 

GoGoPenguinCD

 

Bill Frisell / Music Is / Okeh
Marcus Miller / Laid Black / Blue Note
Terrance Blanchard and the E Collective / Live / Blue Note
Stanley Clarke / The Message / Mack Avenue
GoGo Penquin/ A Humdrum Star / Blue Note
Kamasi Washington / Heaven and Earth / Young Turks
RoB Dixon Trio with Charlie Hunter and Mike Clark/ Coast to Crossroads / RobDixonMusic

 

 

 

Detroit Public Radio mainstay, Judy Adams, is a pianist, composer and musicologist who hosts a Jazz and contemporary music show on CJAM 99.1FM and guest hosts on WRCJ 90.9FM. She made her mark at WDET 101.9FM (NPR), where she was Director of Programming and daily on-air music host for more than 30 years.

 

 

 

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June 22, 2018

NelsCline

 

 

 

This is part one of our profile of great new summer albums that may be of interest to adventurous Jazz Notes readers such as yourself.

 

 

Our two featured albums are both from guitarists Nels Cline and Steve Tibbetts, who couldn’t be more different from each other. However, what they have in common is their dedication to staying true to their original “voice”. They both utilize a creative approach to their music as they discover new sounds that define their unique styles.  Where Nels Cline is frenetic and full of energy, Steve Tibbetts is meditative, dreamy and ethereal but both artists are masterful when it comes to their improvisational abilities.

 

 

NelsCline2

 

 

Artist/Group / Title / Label

 

The Nels Cline 4/ Currents, Constellations/ Blue Note

 

 

Nels Cline is known for his work as lead guitarist with the band Wilco since 2004. He is also getting lots of attention for his genre-bending collaborations with Jazz guitar virtuoso Julian Lage as heard on their 2014 album as a duo, Room, on Detroit’s Mack Avenue Records. Here they explore new musical territory, drawing on everything from Jazz and Blues to Bluegass, and Country.

 

 

“When Julian and I started playing together it kicked my ass hard,” Cline told JazzTimes around the time of Room’s release. “At the same time, it inspired me and refreshed my soul.”

 

 

On Currents and Constellations they’ve since added a rhythm section consisting of of bassist Scott Colley and drummer Tom Rainey to the guitar duo we first heard on Room. The new expanded band really rocks!

 

 

 

 

SteveTibbetts

 

 

 

Steve Tibbetts / Life Of / ECM

 

Guitarist and pianist, Steve Tibbetts, has been a signature artist with ECM records since 1981. “Life Of” is his ninth album on the label. This new release is a collection of musical portraits, mostly of family and friends with titles such as “Life of El” and “Life of Emily.

 

 

Although raised in Midwest America,  Tibbetts has travelled extensively to Southeast Asia, including Bali and Nepal. This is very evident in his music from the use of certain modes and scales to instrumentation and the essence of spirituality. These characteristics have been the foundation of his music, and have defined his sound throughout his career.

 

 

The album features him collaborating with Marc Anderson on percussion and handpan, and Michelle Kinney on cello and drones. The music they create is uncluttered, meditative, other worldly and beautiful.

 

 

Next week’s Jazz Notes features profiles of two more new releases from Robert Glasper and Charles Lloyd.

 

 

Other new albums of note include:
Bill Frisell / Music Is / Okeh
Marcus Miller / Laid Black / Blue Note
Terrance Blanchard and the E Collective / Live / Blue Note
Stanley Clark/ The Message / Mack Avenue
Gogo Penquin/ A Humdrum Star / Blue Note

 

 

 

Detroit Public Radio mainstay, Judy Adams, is a pianist, composer and musicologist who hosts a Jazz and contemporary music show on CJAM 99.1FM and guest hosts on WRCJ 90.9FM. She made her mark at WDET 101.9FM (NPR), where she was Director of Programming and daily on-air music host for more than 30 years.

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June 14, 2018

spaldingCarringtonDJFpressConf.

 

The 2018 Detroit Jazz Festival’s Resident Ensemble featuring Bassist Esperanza Spalding and drummer Terri Lyne Carrington; shown here at the Festival’s press conference in April 2018.

 

 

A new performance feature has been added to the Detroit Jazz Festival. It’s the debut of  Resident Ensemble. Much like the yearly Artist-in-Residence feature, the Resident Ensemble will perform many times both before and during the Festival.

 

A different core “Ensemble” will be chosen each year and will interact with the Detroit music community and feature significant artists in a group setting.   The Detroit Jazz Festival explained that “the Resident Ensemble epitomizes the value of group interaction and shared creative vision that is at the heart of the Jazz art form”.

 

 

This inaugural year for the new ensemble brings us the acclaimed duo of bassist/vocalist Esperanza Spalding and drummer Terri Lyne Carrington. One of their many performance settings includes two nights at the Dirty Dog Jazz Café with two shows each night on Tuesday, June 19 and Wednesday, June 20. For tickets and information call 313-882-5299. This is a chance to witness their creative artistry and improvisational talents up close in the intimate setting of the Dirty Dog Jazz Café.

 

 

GeriAllenACSTrioVanguard

 

The ACS trio at the Village Vanguard with the late great pianist from Detroit, Geri Allen along with Terri Lyne Carrington and Esperanza Spalding.

 

 

Their upcoming performances at the Dirty Dog are a tribute to the award-winning Detroit pianist, composer, Guggenheim felllow and educator, Geri Allen, who died of cancer at the age of 60 on June 27, 2017. During her last few years she was the musical mentor of Esperanza Spalding and Terry Lyne Carrington as the three of them played under her direction in their ACS trio.

 

 

As we mentioned in our Jazz Notes tribute to Allen, the word spread fast of her passing last year with musicians here in Detroit and around the world expressing not only their sadness, but their deep appreciation for the musical gifts she shared with us during brilliant career.

 

She played with such Jazz greats as Charlie Haden, Wayne Shorter, Ornette Coleman, Cassandra Wilson, Carl Craig and countless others, including her husband, trumpeter Wallace Roney.

 

 

Guitarist Vernon Reid said on Twitter, that “Geri Allen advanced the position of women in Jazz and creative music for REAL”.  He called her an “inspiration for original voices”.   The two remaining artists, Spalding and Carrington carrying on in her absence, especially in her home town of Detroit as this year’s Resident Ensemble.

 

 

 

geriAllen CD

 

Detroit’s own Geri Allen (6/12/57-6/27/17). Her 2013 album “Grand River Crossing” that pays tribute to Detroit’s musical legacy.

 

Esperanza Spalding and Terri Lyne Carrington both made statements about playing in Geri Allen’s absence and the significance of playing a Dirty Dog tribute to her in her home town of Detroit. The Detroit News reported her statement about Ms. Allen during the Detroit Jazz Festival press conference in April 2018:  “It’s like bringing the seeds back to the soil of the plant they came from,” said Spalding. “This woman gave us so much. All that she gave us, we’re trying to give a little bit of that back in this space.”
“I think there’s a massive homegoing in a sense,” Carrington said. “The way we’re going to do it with the orchestra, and it’s what she would have wanted. I can see her smiling down. We’re trying to make this as grand as we can … contributing to her legacy.”

 

 

Terri Lyne Carrington  is a jazz drummer, composer, singer, record producer and entrepreneur. She has played with Dizzy Gillespie, Stan Getz, Clark Terry, Herbie Hancock, Wayne Shorter, Joe Sample, Al Jarreau, Yellowjackets, and many others. She toured with each of Hancock’s musical configurations (from electric to acoustic) between 1997 and 2007.
In 2007 she was appointed professor at her alma mater, Berklee College of Music, where she received an honorary doctorate in 2003. She has won three Grammy Awards.

 

Esperanza Emily Spalding is an American jazz bassist and singer, raised in Portland, Oregon, and was a musical prodigy, playing violin in the Chamber Music Society of Oregon at five years old. She was later both self-taught and -trained on a number of instruments, including guitar and bass. Her proficiency earned her scholarships to Portland State University and the Berklee College of Music. In 2017 she was appointed Professor of the Practice of Music at Harvard University.[4]

 

 

She has won four Grammy Awards, including the Grammy Award for Best New Artist at the 53rd Grammy Awards,[5] making her the first jazz artist to win the award.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Detroit Public Radio mainstay, Judy Adams, is a pianist, composer and musicologist who hosts a Jazz and contemporary music show on CJAM 99.1FM and guest hosts on WRCJ 90.9FM. She made her mark at WDET 101.9FM (NPR), where she was Director of Programming and daily on-air music host for more than 30 years.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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June 6, 2018

 

 

 

JazzBlues20's

 

King Oliver’s Creole Jazz Band in Chicago in 1923: Louis Armstrong is kneeling, from left to right behind him are Honore Dutrey, Baby Dodds, King Oliver, Lil Hardin, Bill Johnson and Johnny Dodds.

Frank Driggs Collection/Getty Images

 

 

Jazz and the blues are two of the most influential music genres the world has ever known. They were born out of the African-American cultural experience. With modern technology and the media, Jazz and the Blues were fortunate enough to “go viral” with the advent of radio and records nearly a century ago.

 

 

They influenced the creation of most modern musical forms including R&B, Rock, Country, Funk, Hip Hop, contemporary Classical and more. All of these cross-cultural genres, except for Classical, were born in America. Many of their defining elements, however, came from blending various cultural traditions that originated elsewhere. This is very common, as almost all music is “fusion” when you think about it.

 

 

With its unique syncopated, lilting rhythms, instrumentation and blues based sonorities, Jazz quickly established itself as a major musical art form in Europe, Central and South America, and Asia. Countries with a fervent Jazz scene today include France, Spain, Canada, Norway, Sweden, Denmark, Brazil, Cuba, Puerto Rico, Indonesia, Japan, Italy, and of course the U.S. .

 

 

As we’ve mentioned in the past, innovative European Classical composers such as Rachmaninoff, Ravel, Stravinsky, Debussy, Satie, were all fans of Jazz, and the Blues. Many of them deliberately sought Jazz out while visiting and performing in America in the early part of the 20th century when Classical music was exploring new territory and Jazz was an exciting new artform getting a lot of attention.  You can hear it’s influence in their music – especially the rhythms and use of the Blues scales which were built upon the ancient pentatonic scales primarily from Africa.

 

 

The famous World’s Fairs from the late 19th and early 20th centuries adopted specific cultural themes, featured cultural exchanges from various countries around the world. This exposed the “creative class” to these new and emerging musical and artistic art forms before radio and records came along, spreading music across the world.

 

 

For the first time in human history musicians were able to hear authentic performances of world music from a multitude of cultures as they displayed their ancient traditions on centuries old traditional instruments. All of this had a tremendous effect on Jazz and other emerging genres.

 

 

Just think had it not been for the invention of mass communication and the invention of radio and records we’d be stuck in the 19th century – music and all. Today there are more than three thousand Jazz clubs worldwide in more than 100 countries.

 

 

America should feel proud to recognize and embrace Jazz as a major component of its cultural identity and its unique gift to the world with its ever growing direct and indirect influence on most modern musical forms.

 

 

 

 

 

Detroit Public Radio mainstay, Judy Adams, is a pianist, composer and musicologist who hosts a Jazz and contemporary music show on CJAM 99.1FM and guest hosts on WRCJ 90.9FM. She made her mark at WDET 101.9FM (NPR), where she was Director of Programming and daily on-air music host for more than 30 years.

 

 

 

 

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May 29, 2018

SteveTurreShellTptWCLKcom

WCLK.com

 

 

 

Award-winning trombone master, Steve Turre, returns to the Dirty Dog on Friday and Saturday,  June 1 and 2, with two sets each night. As he’s played some of top Jazz clubs on the international Jazz circuit for decades, he says he really loves the knowledgeable and appreciative Detroit Jazz audience he finds at the Dirty Dog which has become one of his favorite places to perform.

 

 

SteveTurreAllMusicCom

 

 

The trombone is one of the original Jazz instruments which goes back to the days when Jazz’s early instrumentation was derived and influenced by the marching bands in and around New Orleans and other nearby Jazz communities.

 

 

Steve is also a master of another instrument, conch shells, or sometimes called shell trumpets. These ancient wind instruments originated in prehistoric times, pre-dating the trombone which originated in western Europe in the 1500’s.

 

 

STurreNPR org

NPR.org

 

 

Music historians have said that some of the first musical instruments ever invented were most likely made of shells. Shell trumpets have been around since the Magdalenian period (Upper Paleolithic), around 17,000+ years ago!

 

 

ancientConch Shell trumpet

 

 

Conch shell trumpets have been played in many Pacific Island countries, as well as South America and Southern Asia. They have been used in such diverse places as Malta, india and Tibet. They produce a warm, full, and far-carrying tone. Although they were most common in coastal areas around the world, they were found in many inland areas as well.

 

Aztec_conch_shell_trumpeter 16thcent.

 

Aztec shell-trumpet player from 16th century

 

Mr. Turre always brings his shells to his performances at the Dirty Dog and elsewhere. He’s a master conch shell player and uses many different ones, each with different tonal qualities in varying registers, ranging from low to high. They come in all shapes and sizes and no two are alike. Audiences are always fascinated when he plays them, especially in a Jazz context.

 

 

TurreColorsfortheMastersCD

 

Steve Turre’s most recent album: Colors for the Masters featuring Ron Carter and Kenny Barron

 

 

The multi-talented Mr. Turre is also a composer, arranger, and educator at the college and conservatory level. His career spans five decades with involvement in many genres including Jazz, Rock, and Latin Jazz both in live performs, recording projects, television and films.

 

 

He has released more than 20 albums as a leader and has appeared on many others as a side-man. Many people discovered him from his long-time work with the Saturday Night Live band which goes back to 1984.

 

 

 

 

 

Detroit Public Radio mainstay, Judy Adams, is a pianist, composer and musicologist who hosts a Jazz and contemporary music show on CJAM 99.1FM and guest hosts on WRCJ 90.9FM. She made her mark at WDET 101.9FM (NPR), where she was Director of Programming and daily on-air music host for more than 30 years.

 

 

 

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