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A Perfectly Tuned Evening Every Time...
Opened in 2008, The Dirty Dog is one of the premiere destinations in the United States for world class Jazz and cuisine. It combines the charm of an English-style pub with intimacy and meticulous attention to detail and hospitality.
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The Dirty Dog brings together the musicians and guests in a way that creates a lasting impression and desire to come back.
Archive for
Jazz Notes With Judy Adams
April 24, 2019

 

 

 

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Drum legend from Pontiac, Mich. Elvin Jones / photo: Amazon.co UK

 

 

Detroit has had its share of legendary drummers, with a long list that covers many decades and includes such luminaries and style makers as Elvin Jones, Roy Brooks, Louis Hayes, J.C. Heard, Don Moye, Ali Jackson, Pheeroan akLaff, Frank Isola, Art Mardigan, Tani Tabbal and many others.

 

 

Some current Detroit drummers who are making their “mark” on an international scale include Nate Winn, Karriem Riggins, Gayelynn McKinney, Leonard King, Alex White, Djallo Djakate, Mahindi Masai, Renell Gonzalves, Jessie Kramer, Gerald Cleaver, and the multi-award winning Sean Dobbins who performs with his band, “The Modern Jazz Messengers” at the Dirty Dog Jazz Cafe Wednesday May 8th, through Saturday, May 11th.

 

 

 

 

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Sean Dobbins at the Dirty Dog Jazz Cafe

 

 

Dobbins lists the following drummers, among those who have had a major influence on his playing: these include Art Blakey, Jeff “Tain” Watts and Elvin Jones.

 

 

Detroit Music Factory recording artist, Sean Dobbins, is one of the most “sought after” drummers performing today. He’s performed with such Jazz notables as Dr. Lonnie Smith, Johnny O’Neal, Cyrus Chestnut, James “Blood” Ulmer, Benny Golson,and many others.

 

 

He’s also one of the top Jazz educators in this region and is on the faculties at the University of Michigan, Oakland University and Wayne State University. He also serves as the Artistic Director of Jazz Ensembles for the Detroit Symphony and is the Executive Artistic Director of the South Eastern Music Academy.

 

 

The Dirty Dog is also presenting other talented drummers in the coming weeks. These include Willie Jones III April 26 and 27th, and Jeff Canady, May 29-June 1.

 

 

For information and to make reservations for Sean Dobbins and other upcoming performances at the Dirty Dog Jazz Café, call 313-882-5299 or go to DirtyDogJazz.com.

 

 

 

 

Detroit Public Radio mainstay, Judy Adams, is a trained pianist, composer and musicologist.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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April 17, 2019

bebop album cover

 

Vintage album cover/poster with Dizzy Gillespie; HiloBrow.com

 

 

Of all of the Jazz styles, Bebop remains as one of the most sophisticated both in its structure and intricate improvisational forms.

 

 

It has had lasting effect on modern Jazz since its early development in the 1940s and there haven’t been very many Jazz performances since that haven’t included elements of Bebop in one way or another. Its impact was profound.  It revolutionized Jazz for the ensuing decades – up until the present day.

 

 

The development of Bebop was a major turning point in Jazz. It emerged as younger musicians were breaking away from the popular, dance driven, Big Band music, which had dominated Jazz since the late 1920’s.

 

 

Bird,TRane,Dizzy

 

 

It signaled the dawn of modern Jazz – influencing new directions in Jazz and non-Jazz styles that emerged during the second half of the 20th century and even into the 21st century from Jump Music and Rock and Roll to Post-Bop, Avant-garde, Hip hop and more.

 

 

Miles Davis once said, “You can tell the history of Jazz in four words: Louis Armstrong. Charlie Parker”. Armstrong was a foundational figure who influenced the seminal styles of Jazz during its first 50 years and Parker took it from there.

 

 

ArtBlakeyHardBop

 

 

Bebop’s star players and creators not only include Charlie Parker, but Dizzy Gillespie, Max Roach, Miles Davis, Thelonious Monk, Kenny Clarke, Max Roach and others. Listen to any recordings from the 40s or 50s from these artists for an authentic Bebop experience.

 

 

The music is also known for group interaction through complex forms of improvisation while exploring rhythmic accents, manipulating scales with dense phrasing. It’s harmonically daring with band members weaving intricate patterns of notes at break neck speeds, many times in unison, while keeping the music accessible on most levels.

 

 

Bebop was still the hippest and most intellectual music of its time and a favorite of the beat generation. Looking back, and into the future, we can only respect the genre for its historical significance, fearless attitude, brilliant artists and sophisticated content.

 

 

“Bebop was a label that certain journalists later gave it, but we never labeled the music. It was just modern music, we would call it. We wouldn’t call it anything, really, just music.” A statement by drummer Kenny Clarke.

 

 

Bebop’s lasting effect can still be heard in much of the Jazz being performed around the world today. Musicians who play the Dirty Dog Jazz Cafe often play the genre straight up or use Bebop related elements and improvisation techniques in their performance.   Listen for it the next time you are there.

 

 

 

 

Detroit Public Radio mainstay, Judy Adams, is a pianist, composer and musicologist who hosts a Jazz and contemporary music show on CJAM 99.1FM and guest hosts on WRCJ 90.9FM. She made her mark at WDET 101.9FM where she was program director and daily on-air music host for more than 30 years.

 

 

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April 5, 2019

DetroitJazzFestPoster

 

 

 

As a service to our Jazz Notes readers,  we are sharing the initial line-up of performers for this year’s Detroit Jazz Festival which is celebrating it’s 40 anniversary! Here are excerpts from the Detroit Jazz Festival Foundation’s press release from this past week.

 

 

“We’re really excited about the exceptional lineup put together for the 40th year celebration which reflects a reunion of some of the most inspiring performers and performances we’ve had the pleasure of hosting over the last 10 years at the Jazz festival,” said Chris Collins, president and artistic director of the Detroit Jazz Festival Foundation.

 

“From jazz legends to up-and-coming revolutionaries and Detroit homecoming artists, these artists have become a part of our extended family and it’s only appropriate they come back to headline our reunion year.”

 

 

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Partial Initial Lineup 2019 Detroit Jazz Festival

 

 

This includes a real treat as former Artists-in-Residence Ron Carter, Pat Metheny, Joshua Redman, Danilio Pérez and Terence Blanchard will also take a stage for the Festival.

 

 

Below is an initial look at this year’s Festival lineup! What a list!

 

 

Friday, Aug. 30

o Danilio Pérez’s Global Big Band featuring the Detroit Jazz Festival Orchestra and Guests
o Artist-in-Residence: Stanley Clarke – Back-to- ‘School Days’
o The Soul Rebels
o Dr. Valade’s Brass Band led by New Orleans legend, Shannon Powell

 

Saturday, Aug. 31

o Macy Gray
o Ron Carter Quartet
o Yellowjackets with Luciana Souza
o Danilo Pérez’s Global Messengers
o Joe Lovano Nonet
o Untitled Artist: Cameron Graves with the Detroit Jazz Festival Generations Alumni Band
o Sheila Jordan
o The Soul Rebels
o ELEW

 

 

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Stanley Clarke / Photo: Amazon.com

 

Sunday, Sept. 1
o Artist-in-Residence: Stanley Clarke – A night of jazz with the Stanley Clarke Band
o Kenny Garrett Quintet
o Terence Blanchard – AB2 – Art Blakey Project

o Dee Dee Bridgewater and the New Orleans Jazz Orchestra
o Pat Metheny Ron Carter Duo
o John Pizzarelli Trio
o Untitled Artist: Cameron Graves
o Connie Han
o Red Baraat
o Veronica Swift
o Thornetta Davis

 

 

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Pat Metheny / Photo “All About Jazz”

 

 

Monday, Sept. 2

o Artist-in-Residence: Stanley Clarke – ‘Boyz in the Hood’ featuring the Detroit Jazz Festival String Orchestra

o Pat Metheny: Side Eye
o Chucho Valdés – Jazz Batá
o Still Dreaming with Joshua Redman, Ron Miles, Scott Colley and Dave King
o Luciana Souza’s Book of Longing featuring Chico Pinheiro and Scott Colley
o Marialy Pacheco
o The Four Freshmen and 5 Trombones
o Michael Jellick Sextet

 

Go to the festival website for more information:

DetroitJazzFest.com

 

 

 

Detroit Public Radio mainstay, Judy Adams, is a pianist, composer and musicologist who hosts a Jazz and contemporary music show on CJAM 99.1FM and guest hosts on WRCJ 90.9FM. She made her mark at WDET 101.9FM where she was program director and daily on-air music host for more than 30 years.

 

 

 

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March 28, 2019

Jazz Note’s Detroit Birthday Profile: Trumpeter/Band Leader Thad Jones

 

 

ThadJonesMelLewisBigBandYouTube

 

The Thad Jones Mel Lewis Big Band, 1970  (You Tube)

 

 

One of the world’s great music centers, Metro-Detroit, has been the home of so many important musical artists over the years representing several genres. The multi-talented Thad Jones was a member of the musical Jones family from Pontiac, Michigan which also included two other Jazz Greats: Pianist, composer Hank Jones and iconic drummer, Elvin Jones.

 

 

Thaddeus Joseph Jones was born March 28, 1923, and died in Copenhagen, Denmark August 20, 1986. He was known all over the world as a Jazz composer, arranger, bandleader, as well as a virtuoso trumpet and flugelhorn player, and cornetist.

 

 

His amazing career spanned more than sixty years and associated him with such bands and orchestras as those led by some of the most influential and well-respected bands in Jazz including Count Basie, Herbie Hancock, Thelonious Monk and his own highly revered Thad Jones/ Mel Lewis Orchestra.

 

 

The Thad Jones/Mel Lewis Jazz Orchestra was a Jazz big band formed by trumpeter Thad Jones and drummer Mel Lewis in New York in 1965. The band performed for twelve years in its original incarnation, including a 1972 tour of the Soviet Union during the height of the Cold War. (Wikipedia)

 

 

In January 1979, Thad Jones suddenly moved to Copenhagen, Denmark, where several other U.S. jazz musicians had gone to live as expatriates. There he became the leader of The Danish Radio Big Band which he transformed into one of the world’s best Jazz bands. We recently discussed in our blog how many Jazz artists have moved to Europe where they felt the music received more respect and financial support.

 

 

Thad Jones was an extremely prolific artist and recorded more than 24 albums with Count Basie’s orchestra as well as recording four LPs with his younger brother Elvin Jones and one with his older brother, Hank Jones. Other leading artists he played and recorded with during his impressive career included Lou Donaldson, Dexter Gordon, Coleman Hawkins, Milt Jackson, and many others.  Thad Jones also recorded for such major Jazz labels as A&M, Blue Note, Debut and others.

 

 

 

Detroit Public Radio mainstay, Judy Adams, is a pianist, composer and musicologist who hosts a Jazz and contemporary music show on CJAM 99.1FM and guest hosts on WRCJ 90.9FM. She made her mark at WDET 101.9FM where she was program director and daily on-air music host for more than 30 years.

 

 

 

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March 20, 2019

Judy Adams’s Jazz Notes: Jazz Goes Global

 

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As we have mentioned in our blog many times over the years, Jazz and the Blues are two of the most influential music genres the world has ever known. They influenced the creation of most modern musical forms including R&B, Rock, Country, Funk, Hip Hop and more.

 

Blending cultural elements from various cultures from Africa, the Middle East, Europe, Asia and many more. These genres are also mostly made in America. With modern technology and the media, these styles ‘went viral” with the advent of radio and records nearly a century ago.  Jazz and Blues sonorities and rhythmic elements have reverberated all over the world since the beginning of the 20th century if not sooner.

 

 

European classical composers such as Rachmaninoff, Ravel, Debussy, Satie, were all drawn to Jazz and its influence is evident in their music. They were huge fans of Jazz, especially after be exposed to it on their visits to America.

 

 

More than ever, America needs to recognize and embrace Jazz as a major component of its cultural identity. Much like European countries have embraced Classical music as one of their major contributions to world culture. While Jazz has a huge following here at home, there’s still room for more Americans to accept Jazz as part of our musical heritage.

 

 

Today, Jazz has established itself as a major musical art form in Europe, Central and South America, and Asia. Countries with a fervent Jazz scene include France, Spain, Canada, Norway, Sweden, Denmark, Brazil, Cuba, Puerto Rico, Indonesia, Japan, Italy, and of course the U.S.

 

 

There are more than three thousand Jazz clubs worldwide in more than 100 countries and 38 American states. International Jazz Day is a yearly event on April 30, organized by UNESCO to celebrate “the virtues of Jazz as an educational tool, and a force for peace, unity, dialogue and enhanced cooperation among people”.

 

 

Many musicians have said that there seems to be more support, acceptance and appreciation for Jazz outside the U.S. than here at home. Major Jazz recording artists have consistently found more gigs in other countries than in America when on tour.These attitudes led to many artists becoming expatriates and moving to countries where there was more support for the music.

 

 

This includes well known artists such as civil rights activist, actress, singer, Josephine Baker, who became a huge star in France in the 1920’s and beyond. Also, saxophonist Dexter Gordon, who left the United States in the 1960s to live in, primarily, Paris and Copenhagen. There, he played with fellow expatriates and continued to record for Blue Note. He experienced better treatment in Europe, as a Jazz player, than he had in the United States.

 

 

The great Jazz singer/songwriter, pianist and activist,  Nina Simone, lived in Liberia, Switzerland, England, Barbados and elsewhere before eventually settling down in the South of France.

 

 

 

This is still happening today as American artists continue to find more financial support for their music in other countries who quite often pay artists a stipend to support their efforts to maintain a higher quality of life in their communities.

 

 

We must remember that America is still a young country. It needs to celebrate its highly influential cultural identity with Jazz – a true American art form, which is more highly revered elsewhere than it is here at home. American Jazz has had a major influence on most of the music around the world in the past 100 years. It’s time we acknowledged how much we have contributed to world culture. We have so much to be proud of.

 

 

 

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Dexter Gordon spent years living and performing in Paris, France. In 1986, he was nominated for an Academy Award for his role in the French film, Round Midnight and was awarded the Order of Arts and Letters by the French Ministry of Culture. “Our Man in Paris” is a album he recorded in 1963. The album’s title refers to where the recording was made, Gordon (who had moved to Copenhagen a year earlier) teaming up with fellow expatriates Bud Powell and Kenny Clarke, both Parisian residents, and native Parisian Pierre Michelot.

 

 

 

Detroit Public Radio mainstay, Judy Adams, is a pianist, composer and musicologist who hosts a Jazz and contemporary music show on CJAM 99.1FM and guest hosts on WRCJ 90.9FM. She made her mark at WDET 101.9FM where she was program director and daily on-air music host for more than 30 years.

 

 

 

 

 

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March 7, 2019

RonEnglishDanceCryDance

 

 

Legendary Guitarist, composer and educator, Ron English, has been a major figure in Detroit’s contemporary Jazz scene since the late 1960’s. Since the beginning of this year he became a permanent fixture with a new role at the Dirty Dog each and every Tuesday night leading his band for a night of excellent live Jazz.

 

 

Drawing on his many years as a multi-talented Jazz performer, and session musician where he toured and performed with Motown and other artists for many years, he brings us music from a variety of Jazz styles from classic Jazz to the blues, funk, Soul Jazz, Gospel and everything in between. He’s also known for his work with world renowned avant-garde 70’s era, Detroit label/brand Strata records as a performer and producer, and the well-respected Detroit Artist’s Workshop.

 

 

He is now the purveyor of the Dirty Dog’s very popular Tuesday night Jazz scene. He’s taking over from retiring band leader and pianist Charles Boles, who he played guitar with for seven years when Boles held the leadership position at the Dirty Dog where they reigned for nearly a decade after following in the footsteps of the late Bluesman, Johnny Bassett. During his career, Charles Boles shared the stage and studio with such legendary figures as Etta James, Aretha Franklin, Marvin Gaye, Lou Rawls, B.B. King, and others.

 

 

These artists helped create a special cozy Jazz scene on Tuesdays where it’s filled with a DDJC crowd of regulars, who just about sell the place out each week as they make new friends while enjoying a fine menu of  superb live Jazz and excellent food.

 

 

For his band, Ron English, continues the tradition and has surrounded himself with some of Detroit’s best, including bass players Jeff Pedraz or Jaribu Shahid, Renell Gonsalves on drums and James Hughes on alto and tenor saxophone.

 

 

There’s also no cover charge, so as Ron says
“come on out, and come back! It’s a different show each week!”

 

Don’t forget to check out Ron English’s new album on Detroit Music Factory records “Dance Cry Dance”.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Detroit Public Radio mainstay, Judy Adams, is a pianist, composer and musicologist who hosts a Jazz and contemporary music show on CJAM 99.1FM and guest hosts on WRCJ 90.9FM. She made her mark at WDET 101.9FM where she was program director and daily on-air music host for more than 30 years.

 

 

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February 21, 2019

straightAheadGroupShotJohnOsler

Straight Ahead performing at the Dirty Dog Jazz Cafe. They’ll be back in April!

Photo: John Osler

 

 

Jazz Notes with Judy Adams

 

Jazz Bands – Big and Small, Part Two: The Rhythm Section is the Core

 

Jazz is so creative and diverse the performance medium comes in all shapes and sizes. As our blog has discussed in the past, there are Jazz combos, Jazz orchestras, Jazz trios, quartets and even nonets. Some consist of just a few musicians and some are large ensembles of 50 or more. Whatever the music calls for, the musicians will fill the roles.

 

 

The size of the group coincides with the composer’s score and vision as well as the type of Jazz that is being played. The larger ensembles frequently play Big Band or orchestral Jazz requiring the music to be more structured and often written out into a score or charts and sometimes even utilizing a band leader. The smaller groups, on the other hand, play a more intimate style of Jazz allowing for more improvisation and interplay among the musicians.

 

 

At the core of most Jazz groups, regardless of size, is the rhythm section, which consists of piano (or other keyboards), bass and drums. This is also a stand-alone performance configuration that is otherwise known as a Jazz combo or Jazz trio.

 

 

A basic Jazz combo or rhythm section is the foundation of most Jazz ensembles. It provides the three essential ingredients of the music: harmony, melody and rhythm. The keyboard actually supports all three elements with the bass establishing the chordal roots of the harmonic structure as well as supporting the rhythmic patterns of the drums, which supply the basic beats and pulse.

 

 

The Dirty Dog Jazz Cafe hosts many different types of Jazz ensembles from the big band sounds of R.J. Spangler’s Planet D Nonet to the Gary Shunk Trio.

 

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Coming soon to the Dirty Dog Jazz Cafe is a group that exemplifies the creative potential of the medium-size Jazz combo. They are a perfect example of a basic trio/rhythm section with a vocal and saxophone soloist.

 

 

They are Detroit’s Grammy-nominated, “Straight Ahead”, and will perform in late April. For details call 313-882-5299.

 

 

Current lineup includes founding members, Marion Hayden on bass, Alina Moore on piano, Regina Carter on violin and Gayelynn McKinney on drums. They are joined by Kymberli Wright on vocals and a special guest Yancyy on saxophone. Catch them if you can!

 

 

 

Detroit Public Radio mainstay, Judy Adams, is a pianist, composer and musicologist who hosts a Jazz and contemporary music show on CJAM 99.1FM and guest hosts on WRCJ 90.9FM. She made her mark at WDET 101.9FM where she was program director and daily on-air music host for more than 30 years.

 

 

 

 

 

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February 7, 2019

 

The award-winning Detroit-based label Mack Avenue records has a world-wide reputation for courting major artists and up and coming talent which is evident with these two musicians.

 

Artist/Group/ Album / Label

 

Joey DeFrancesco / In the Key of the Universe /Mack Avenue Records

Julian Lage/ Love Hurts / Mack Avenue

 

 

JulianLageLoveHurts

 

 

 

Grammy award winning Julian Lage is considered one of the most virtuosic guitarists and composers in contemporary Jazz. He shares his fascination with various current and historical American musical traditions from Jazz and Blues to Folk, and Bluegrass – all played within an approach that includes creative aspects of improvisational/ musical free association. He does this with amazing technique and an original style.

 

 

Julian Lage plays a mix of originals plus a diverse mix of music by Keith Jarrett, Ornette Coleman, Roy Orbison and others.This third album from Lage on Mack Avenue features his trio with bassist Jorge Roeder and drummer Dave King known for his work with the Bad Plus.

 

 

Release date world-wide is Feb. 22.

 

 

Joey DeFrancesco is at the top of the list of favorites for fans of organ Jazz.

This veteran player’s music is categorized as Jazz just as Julien Lage’s is, but their styles couldn’t be more different which shows us how broad the Jazz umbrella is to hold such a diverse musical platform that encompasses so many styles and periods. In this album, Joey shows us his spiritual side.

 

 

Joey DeFrancesco’s new album is called “In The Key of the Universe” and reflects the artist’s respect for the contributions of the early leaders of the free Jazz movement of the 1950’s-1970’s led by people such as Sun Ra, John Coltrane, Pharoah Sanders and many others.

 

 

Joey and the band even cover the free Jazz anthem, “The Creator Has a Master Plan”, composed by Pharoah Sanders and Leon Thomas. On top of that he selected saxophonist/vocalist Pharoah Sanders to be in the band along with other other top artists including Billy Hart, drums, Sammy Figueroa on percussion and Troy Roberts on saxophone and bass. It’s an allstar lineup to say the least. The official release date is March 1, 2019.

 

 

Organ Jazz fans take note that the Dirty Dog presents organist Gerard Gibbs Feb. 27-March 2. Gibbs plays piano, Hammond B-3 organ and keyboards for saxophonist James Carter and tours with him both nationally and internationally. He also leads his own keyboard Jazz quartet and Hammond organ Jazz trio.

 

 

Gibbs did such a great job pleasing the crowd at the Dirty Dog last fall they’ve invited him back again.

 

For more information contact the Dirty Dog Jazz cafe at 313-882-5299 or go to their website, dirtydogjazz.com.

 

 

Detroit Public Radio mainstay, Judy Adams, is a pianist, composer and musicologist who hosts a Jazz and contemporary music show on CJAM 99.1FM and guest hosts on WRCJ 90.9FM. She made her mark at WDET 101.9FM (NPR), where she was Director of Programming and daily on-air music host for more than 30 years.

 

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January 24, 2019

RayseBiggs@DirtyDogOsler

Rayse Biggs /photo  by John Osler

 

 

Celebrating the Trumpet with Rayse Biggs and Anthony Stanco

 

 

 

The Dirty Dog Jazz Cafe brings us two great Detroit based trumpeters in the coming weeks, Anthony Stanco, February 13-16 and Rayse Biggs March 20-23.

 

 

As the loudest and highest pitched member of the brass family, the trumpet often takes the lead voice in an ensemble. It dates back to around 2000 B.C. and evidence of early trumpet type instruments has been found on virtually every continent.

 

The trumpet has played a prominent role in Jazz throughout its history. It’s bright, exuberant sound has made it one of the most well-loved instruments used in Jazz since the beginning of the art form when most instruments were portable as they were an important part of marching bands used in gatherings such as parades and other processions.

 

 

From the late 1890’s to the mid-1920’s the trumpet led the band lineup which also included cornet, clarinet, trombone, banjo, bass, and tuba and only occasionally the saxophone which rose to prominence after the advent of the big band and swing era.

 

 

Some of the music’s most important artists have been trumpeters including early Jazz pioneers King Oliver, and Louis Armstrong. The multi-faceted trumpeter/composer Miles Davis had a major influence on Jazz for five decades which included the founding of Be Bop in the 1940’s along with trumpeter Dizzy Gillespie who also helped create Latin Jazz. For more than 30 years, award winning trumpeter Wynton Marsalis has been one of today’s top Jazz performers and has devoted his career to promoting the music to both Classical and Jazz audiences worldwide.

 

 

A short list of other significant Jazz trumpeters who made their mark over the years includes Clifford Brown, Lee Morgan, Freddie Hubbard, Bix Biederbecke, Chet Baker, Maynard Ferguson, Quincy Jones, Woody Shaw, Clark Terry, Hugh Masekela, Lester Bowie, Roy Eldridge, the recently deceased Roy Hargrove, as well as Detroiters Donald Byrd, Lonnie Hillyer, Marcus Belgrave and Howard McGhee and Pontiac’s Thad Jones to name a few.

 

 

World renowned Trumpeter and educator Marcus Belgrave came to Rayse Biggs’ junior high school in 1969 and later became a mentor to Mr. Biggs. Soon after he utilized his many talents and went on many impressive tours with a number of Motown groups such as Smokey Robinson, the Marvelettes and the Temptations.

 

 

Since then his talents and musical travels have taken him far and wide to such distant places as Senegal and elsewhere around the globe, performing with the likes of Kem, Was Not Was, The Dramatics, Kidd Rock, Bob Dylan, Recloose and many others.

 

AnthonyStancoAguanko

Anthony Stanco, Photo by Aguanko

 

 

Anthony Stanco has done his share of traveling with Jazz. I first met him and heard him play about 10 years ago when he was performing in the Jazz Discovery series I produced at the Music Hall. The series showcased young, newly emerging Jazz talent from around the region. He showed his many musical talents early on; having started playing in fifth grade.

 

 

He then joined the Detroit Symphony’s Civic Jazz Orchestra under the direction of Marcus Belgrave and Rodney Whitaker. Soon Stanco started playing professionally while in high school. He was then accepted by the prestigious Manhattan School of Music for his college education and musical advancement.

 

 

Currently, Anthony is proud to represent the government’s Bureau of Education and Cultural Affairs. “Anthony Stanco and The Crucial Elements” have done two international tours with American Music Abroad. On tour they partake in cultural exchange, masterclasses, and live concerts. Hearing him play is a real treat as he combines his love of and deep feeling for the music with his flawless interpretations of the art form we call Jazz.

 

 

 

 

Detroit Public Radio mainstay, Judy Adams, is a pianist, composer and musicologist who hosts a Jazz and contemporary music show on CJAM 99.1FM and guest hosts on WRCJ 90.9FM. She made her mark at WDET 101.9FM (NPR), where she was Director of Programming and daily on-air music host for more than 30 years.

 

 

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January 17, 2019

JazzListeningGroupFlickrCom

Photo: Flickr.com

 

 

Is listening to Jazz a private or shared experience?

 

 

Communal music experiences have been around since the beginning of time and continue to exist in improvisational forms today such as Jazz, Folk, Contemporary Classical, Dance and World music, Hip Hop and other contemporary forms. However, except for these genre and live concerts, most of today’s music tends to be “personal” and not a shared experience.

 

 

JazzHeadphonesAllAboutJazzCom

 

Photo: AllAboutJazz.com

 

In the past 100 years or so we’ve witnessed a dramatic change in how we hear music. With the advent of radio, television, records, the internet, CDs, MP3s, You Tube, ITunes, etc. we have more choices than ever before. At the same time the listening experience has become more detached and desensitized. It is more private and less of a group experience that usually brought people together.

 

 

These new devices bring us sounds – but they are still artificial copies of the real thing.  Live music is a uniquely personal and shared experience that can be meditative, and enriching in ways that can’t be felt with a recording. It allows the listeners to pick up on the natural overtones of the instruments, feel the artist’s emotions and watch how the music is being made in real time.

 

 

Listeners in a live audience share a communal experience with each other and with the musicians on stage with the energy flowing both ways as the musicians “play off the audience” sensing their emotional and physical reactions as well. As we have pointed out many times in “Jazz Notes”,  all music was live, in all of human history, until the last one hundred years or so.

 

 

Admittedly, new personal digital file formats that are dominating the listening choices, are creating mostly private and not shared experiences.

 

 

Is listening to Jazz a private or communal experience? Or is it both?

 

 

I think it is both because Jazz is often heard live and is an improvisational music genre both  lending themselves to listeners and the performers engaging in a shared communal experience which has become a rare musical treat in today’s highly technical world. Jazz is also enjoyed on recordings by many of its fans.

 

 

 

 

Detroit Public Radio mainstay, Judy Adams, is a pianist, composer and musicologist who hosts a Jazz and contemporary music show on CJAM 99.1FM and guest hosts on WRCJ 90.9FM. She made her mark at WDET 101.9FM where she was program director and daily on-air music host for more than 30 years.

 

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Visit the Dirty Dog Jazz Channel on YouTube to view our collection of videos. Watch Now
The Dirty Dog brings together the musicians and guests in a way that creates a lasting impression and desire to come back.
        Drum legend from Pontiac, Mich. Elvin Jones / photo: Amazon.co UK   [..]
On April 15 fire ravished Notre Dame Cathedral in Paris.       Images of Our Lady of Pari [..]
  Vintage album cover/poster with Dizzy Gillespie; HiloBrow.com     Of all of the Jaz [..]
Each week the Dirty Dog Jazz Cafe hosts live performances from the greatest jazz musicians across the country.
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Jason Marsalis
STARTS: Fri, May 17 2019
ENDS: Sat, May 18 2019